Year: 2020

Axon Capital’s Singh Sees Vaccine Boosting Travel, Entertainment Stocks | Investing News

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Services company stocks, especially those linked to travel and leisure, have room to rocket higher next year as consumers venture out again after spending on goods but cutting back on services during the pandemic, hedge fund manager Dinakar Singh said.

With vaccines against Covid on the horizon, Singh, who runs Axon Capital, expects a flood of pent-up demand for travel to see far-flung business clients and employees, visit grandparents and take vacations.

“Things are going to be explosive,” Singh, who headed Goldman Sachs’ proprietary trading unit before forming his own fund in 2005, said at the Reuters Global Investment Outlook Summit. “There well could be a huge surge of pent up demand for activities that have been restricted because of the virus.”

After personal savings rates climbed early in the pandemic, stocks broadly recovered. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index has gained 12% since January and

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(AAL), (BKNG) – 2 Travel Stocks To Watch That Reached New Highs In 2020 (And No, They Aren’t Airline Or Cruise Stocks)

While some may consider these consumer discretionaries as “epicenter stocks,” it’s safe to say that there’s a much more specific focus on travel stocks as a whole of late. A bucket of cold water was thrown onto travel and leisure stocks during the first quarter of the year. Everything from airline stocks to cruise stocks, hotels, and casinos; all were hit hard by the restrictions brought by the coronavirus pandemic. Obviously, this extended into all areas of this space including restaurants, night clubs, and, of course, car rental stocks. 

Year-to-date, Delta Air Lines Inc (NYSE: DAL) is still down 30%, American Airlines Group Inc (NASDAQ: AAL) is down 49%, and United Airlines Holdings Inc (NASDAQ: UAL) is down 51%. While these might’ve recovered since March, there’s still quite a long way to go. 

Will Vaccine Hopes Outweigh Coronavirus Concerns?

That also goes for many of

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What restrictions are in place?

The latest travel advice for Scotland (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
The latest travel advice for Scotland (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Scotland offers some of the most beautiful surroundings for a staycation, from the wild Highlands and Hebrides to the city break charm offered by Edinburgh and Glasgow.

But the current coronavirus pandemic means there are varying travel restrictions across the UK, which in some cases mean you cannot travel to Scotland.

Here’s everything you need to know.

Am I allowed to travel to Scotland from the rest of the UK?

It all depends on where you’re going, where you’re coming from and why.

As of Thursday 5 November, England has been under a second nationwide lockdown, which bans domestic and international leisure travel.

It means those in England should not be travelling to Scotland for a holiday or for any purpose that’s not deemed essential and doing so would break the law.

Wales, which just ended its “fire-break” lockdown, has an

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Can I travel after lockdown? The key questions and answers

Missing persons: Waterloo station, normally the busiest transport terminal in Europe (Simon Calder)
Missing persons: Waterloo station, normally the busiest transport terminal in Europe (Simon Calder)

England’s nationwide lockdown may be ending on 2 December, but that doesn’t mean all restrictions are being lifted. Here’s everything you need to know about travelling after lockdown.

What are the current rules on travel within the UK and when will they change?

In England, no one should be travelling except for essential reasons – such as for work, education, medical treatment and other important journeys.

From one minute past midnight on Wednesday 2 December this will end – and with it 27 days of lockdown in England.

The prime minister said: “As we end our national restrictions on 2 December, they will not be replaced with a free for all. England will instead continue to use a sensible approach based on three tiers.

“And since the prevalence of the disease is, alas, still high, these tiers

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