A $12 billion loss for 2020, Delta is cautious in early 2021

Delta Air Lines closed the books on a disastrous 2020 with a comparatively small fourth-quarter loss, and executives expect a few more rocky months before — they hope — widespread coronavirus vaccinations and testing might salvage something of the upcoming summer travel season.

Delta on Thursday reported a quarterly loss of $755 and $12.4 billion in losses for all of 2020. It is the largest annual loss in the history of the airline, which dates to the 1920s, and the global pandemic ended a decade in which Delta churned out a profit each and every year.

The fourth-quarter numbers likely would have been worse but for a December increase in air travel that likely contributed to another surge in virus infections as millions crossed the country to spend time with family and friends during the holidays.

Delta is the first major U.S. airline to report year-end financial results and the

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Travel via the open road rather than the friendly skies

There are a lot of new normals on the PGA Tour these days, from nasal swabs to no fans or grandstands and to the missing post-victory embrace greenside with wife or girlfriend. Welcome to pro golf in the COVID-19 era.

But there’s been another, perhaps unexpected, new normal that actually isn’t so new at all: Driving from one tournament to the next.

At least that’s what C.T. Pan and his wife, Yingchun Lin, are doing, eschewing plush but pricey private jet travel as well as the tour’s more affordable but also more crowded weekly charter flight (another new normal) for the open road.

“Before we bought the RV we searched out the routes between tournaments,” Pan said. “It’s not that bad.”

That depends on one’s definition.

The trip from Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, where the tour resumed its season last week after three months off, to this week’s

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Housing spark and clothes shopping is back, at least online

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

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TRAVEL & LEISURE: Travel is resuming slowly with hotels and airlines operating under new rules. There is already some uneasiness about crowding and the lack of social distancing.

— The Transportation Security Administration screened 607,540 people at U.S. airports Monday, the highest total since March 19 but 78% lower than a year ago.

— Lufthansa will resume flights to Shanghai on Wednesday, its first regular scheduled flights to mainland China since late January. The German carrier will offer one flight from Frankfurt to Shanghai every Wednesday, and in the opposite direction every Friday. Delta plans its first flight to Shanghai since early February on Thursday, when it resumes service from Seattle via

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Northeast travel restrictions add to small business owners’ struggles

Every year, more than 20 million visitors flock to Boston’s Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which, after being closed for several months, reopened July 1.

But for the first time in its nearly 300-year history, it’s largely empty.

“There is no foot traffic,” business owner Sara Youngelson told ABC News. “It is so far and few between, it’s just been really, really tough.”

For Youngelson, who owns five businesses in the Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market area, the past five months have been some of the most difficult of her 30-year career as a merchant in the historic marketplace

Many merchants and shop owners across the Northeast were optimistic that reopening later in the summer could help offset economic damage caused by the pandemic, but with newly instated state travel restrictions affecting tourism, many are no longer as hopeful.

PHOTO: Visitors walk outside Faneuil Hall Marketplace, one of Boston’s most popular

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